June 12, 2014

Wind energy industry continues to lower carbon emissions

The wind energy industry was able to lower the total carbon dioxide emissions by an excess of 5 percent in 2013, which is the equivalent of removing at least 20 million cars off the roads in the U.S.

Wind energy production saw one of its busiest years in 2013. According to the new American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) May 2014 press release, the industry had several milestones in energy production and pollution reduction.

According to the AWEA report, the wind energy industry was able to lower total carbon dioxide emissions by an excess of 5 percent in 2013, which is the equivalent of removing at least 20 million cars off the roads in the U.S.

The total carbon emissions removed with wind energy production were a massive 126.8 million tons in 2013. Throughout the U.S., some states had reached higher carbon emission reduction rates than the nation average.

There were 11 different states that lowered their carbon dioxide emissions by 10 percent in comparison to the 2011 levels specifically from wind energy, the AWEA reported.

Texas leading the way in wind energy

In Texas, the total wind energy production reached an all-time high, with 10,296 megawatts produced to its main grid operator in March 2014, Clean Technica reported. Of the 35,786 megawatts being used in the state, 29 percent of the energy total was coming from Texas wind energy.

Not only did wind energy provide nearly a third of the Texas' total energy, but it also had the highest amount of carbon dioxide emission reductions in the nation in 2013, which were followed by Illinois, California and Colorado, the AWEA reported.

The total wind energy production also dropped the amount of sulfur dioxide emissions in the U.S. by nearly 347 million pounds per year, the AWEA reported. The total nitrous oxide emissions were also lowered by 214 million pounds per year from the continuous growth of wind energy in the nation.

The AWEA found that while in 2003 the total wind energy production only made up 0.3 percent of the nation's power generation, it increased to 1.3 percent by 2008. One of the biggest contributors to the increase in wind turbines has been the affordability.

In the last five years, the typical purchase price of wind energy has decreased by more than 40 percent, which is only second to natural gas for the lowest cost source of new electric generation in the country, the AWEA reported.

With wind production changing the energy game in the U.S., more turbine owner and operators turn to Broadwind Energy for uptower maintenance and wind turbine blade maintenance to keep farms running efficiently.